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How to Keep Your Training Skills Sharp

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 4/4/16 4:00 AM
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There are many things in life that require a tune-up periodically to ensure consistent performance. For example, I have to tune up my car, bicycle, and heating system. Almost everything breaks down over time but professionals help us prolong the life of our vehicles and other possessions. Well, trainers can also break down over time if we’re not careful. Instructor burnout is a real problem especially if we conduct too many training sessions mixed with constant travel.

 

This blog is about how to keep our training skills sharp and well-tuned so we can prolong our time as trainers and keep our performance top-notch.

 

In our Advanced Instructional Techniques workshop we offer many checklists full of ideas to incorporate into our training. New ideas and instructional techniques keep our training fresh and new. When we change things up there are many benefits to both our learners and ourselves. Our trainees learn better and stay engaged, and we continue to enjoy what we do and prolong our time in the profession.

 

The following five instructional techniques are some of my favorites to keep my skills sharp and my training fresh:

 

  1. Always point out how the course content fits into your learner’s jobs.

  2. Do unexpected things like sitting with the learners or telling a short story.

  3. Have learners choose from a variety of activities instead of everyone doing the same thing.

  4. Towards the end of a long training day or week, perform a simple magic trick to boost the energy level in the room.

  5. Use brainteasers when learners return from breaks to refocus the class in a fun way.

There are many instructional techniques we can incorporate to liven up our training and prevent burnout—I’ve only shared a few of my favorites! In training there is always more than one way to do just about everything. Keep that in mind when you design your classes.

 

What do you do to prevent burnout and keep your training lively and varied?

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Lynne has been a course leader with Langevin since 2007. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Penn State University and a Master’s degree in Education from Boston University. After working many years in human resources and sales, Lynne transitioned into training, her true passion, where she’s been facilitating since 1994. Her training philosophy is simple—learning should be fun! The essence of a good instructor is someone who can make complex things easy to understand and fun to learn. In her free time, you’ll find Lynne cycling, hiking, downhill skiing, and scuba diving.

Topics: instructional techniques

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Our very own world-class course leaders share their experiences, tips, best practices, and expertise on virtual training, instructional design, needs analysis, e-learning, delivery, evaluation, presentation skills, facilitation, and much more!

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