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Langevin's Train-the-Trainer Blog

Lynne Koltookian

Lynne has been a course leader with Langevin since 2007. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Penn State University and a Master’s degree in Education from Boston University. After working many years in human resources and sales, Lynne transitioned into training, her true passion, where she’s been facilitating since 1994. Her training philosophy is simple—learning should be fun! The essence of a good instructor is someone who can make complex things easy to understand and fun to learn. In her free time, you’ll find Lynne cycling, hiking, downhill skiing, and scuba diving.

Recent Posts

5 Reasons to Play Games in Training

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 10/15/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Kevin Amrulloh via Pixabay

Help release the inner child in your participants by playing games in your training sessions. Sure, you’ve likely played Jeopardy and Who Wants to be a Millionaire in your training, but did you ever stop to think about all the benefits of playing those games? How often have you designed a workshop and thought about how to spice things up or add fun and high energy to the learning process? There are many ways to add fun and excitement to your training, but a sure-fire way to do it is to play a short game. Notice I said a short game? Like any activity, games in training should be fun but not too long. If a game goes on too long the learners become bored and will disengage.

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Tags: making training fun, gamification, games in training, instructional design

Who is Responsible for Ensuring Training Success?

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 9/17/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Gerd Altmann via Pixabay

When I deliver Langevin workshops, I often share with clients that it takes a triple play at an organization to ensure training success. What do I mean by this? For training to be successful, every organization needs three groups of people working together to ensure positive results. The three groups responsible for ensuring training success are: managers, training professionals, and employees. Each one of these groups has specific responsibilities to ensure training works for everyone.

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Tags: managing training, make your training stick

Top 5 Reasons to Run a Pilot Course

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 7/9/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: English via Pixabay

Sometimes you might think that running a pilot for a newly designed course is like flossing your teeth. You are constantly reminded to do it, you know it’s very important, but you never seem to have the time to do it! I know, I know—I’ve been where you are. You have many tasks to accomplish in your job and very little time to do them all. You just finished Langevin’s Instructional Design for New Designers workshop and you come back to work and think, “I don’t have time to do all 12 steps of the instructional design process. Where can I take shortcuts?”

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Tags: instructional design, pilot course

5 Timeless Training Concepts

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 5/7/18 8:00 AM

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Source: Pixabay

I’m a big fan of working out and staying fit. At my local gym, I often notice exercise programs change frequently. One day they are offering cross-fit, a few months later they are offering fitness 360, a few months later they are offering fitness boot camp, and on and on. One fad fitness workout program after another. Who knew there were so many ways to keep fit!

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Tags: adult learning principles, instructional design, instructional techniques, facilitation skills, presentation skills, public speaking skills, technology and training

3 Barriers to Learning and How to Prevent Them

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 2/26/18 8:00 AM

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Source: pxhere

It always amazes me to see how many things can block the learning process. People are so distracted nowadays. Smart phones present obvious distractions to learning but there are so many other subtle, and not so subtle, ways that can take someone’s focus away from the classroom. Distractions are like thorns in an instructor’s side! We work so hard to make people feel comfortable and to create a pleasant learning environment. What do learners do? Well, sometimes they don’t pay attention or, even worse, they believe they can multi-task and learn at the same time!

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Tags: instructional techniques, facilitation skills

5 Critical Items to Remember Before You Train

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 12/18/17 8:00 AM

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Photo by: TeroVesalainen via Pixabay

I don’t know about you, but I can’t seem to remember all my passwords. I have so many that my mind is exploding trying to retain them! As we move closer to the new year I pledge to make a list of all my passwords and keep them safe. As an instructor, I think it’s also a good practice to make a list of the critical items we need to remember before we teach. This way we can be prepared for every training session!

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Tags: instructional techniques, facilitation skills

5 Reasons to Deal with Difficult Learners Quickly

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 10/2/17 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Deutsch via Pixabay

Nobody likes conflict. In fact, there’s lots of training available on how to avoid it, how to deal with it, and how to manage it. Conflict can even happen in our training sessions. Trainers often refer to this challenge as “managing difficult learners.” It’s not the learners themselves that are difficult, it’s their behavior. Difficult behaviors can manifest in many ways, including side bar conversations, inappropriate questions, ill-timed electronics usage, and late arrivals.

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Tags: difficult participants

My Journey through the 4 Stages of Learning in the Virtual Classroom

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 7/31/17 8:00 AM

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Do you know about the four Stages of Learning? In our workshop, How Adults Learn, we introduce new instructors to these important stages. Everyone starts out at stage one as a Novice. At this stage, we can feel nervous and scared because “we don’t know, what we don’t know.” As we progress to the Apprentice stage, we start to realize “how much we still need to learn.”

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Tags: adult learning principles, instructional design, virtual classroom

Checklist of 5 Key Items for a Successful Training Session

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 5/22/17 8:00 AM

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We have so many passwords to remember for all the various websites we use these days—I’ve found my mind exploding trying to retain them all! To make it easier, I’ve pledged to make a master list of all my passwords so I’ll never forget them. I also think, as professional corporate trainers, it’s a good practice to make a list of all the critical things we need to remember before we deliver a training session. This way we can be as close as possible to perfection in every class!

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Tags: facilitation skills, instructional techniques, instructor-led training

6 Reasons to Add Buffer Time to Your Training

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 3/20/17 8:00 AM

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Have you ever run through an airport to catch a connecting flight, heart pounding, chest heaving, only to end up missing it? If so, then you can relate to not having enough buffer time to get from one airport gate to the next. This experience recently happened to me—I made my flight, but it was too close for comfort and I was so frustrated that the airline hadn’t allowed for enough buffer time.

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Tags: instructional design

About this Blog

Our very own world-class course leaders share their experiences, tips, best practices, and expertise on virtual training, instructional design, needs analysis, e-learning, delivery, evaluation, presentation skills, facilitation, and much more!

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