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Langevin's Train-the-Trainer Blog

How to Use Spacing and Sequencing to Optimize Learning

Posted by Madonna Wagner on 4/16/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Gerd Altmann via Pixabay

Companies spend millions of dollars yearly to send employees to train in their respective fields. The employee who can take what they learn and enhance or improve their overall job performance is one in whom the companies’ money is well spent. Instructional designers must develop training that is dynamic and easy to implement. Though there are many factors that contribute to learners’ ability to process and retain information, the focus here is on the spacing and sequencing of content. Some have used these two terms interchangeably, but they are very different.

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Aligning Training and Organizational Objectives

Posted by Paul Sitter on 4/9/18 8:00 AM

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Source: Pixabay

When I have a workshop coming up, I survey the participants to figure out what they are looking for in the course. In a recent course, one survey response struck me because I’ve heard it—or variations of it—so many times before: “I want a course plan that moves from the strategic level to the details that my call center employees need to do their job better.” This is a single, concise sentence describing what we do as part of the instructional design process! Of course, we are not all working with call center employees, but the relation between the overall goals of the organization and what ends up in the classroom is something that applies to us all.

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Tags: managing training

5 Essential Steps to Create Questions that Ensure Learners “Get It”

Posted by James Summers on 4/2/18 8:00 AM

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Source: pxhere

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Tags: instructional techniques

3 Tips to Improve Learning Based on the Cognitive Load Principles

Posted by Dawn Lang on 3/26/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Elisa via Pixabay

Cognitive load refers to the total amount of information your working memory can handle. If the demands placed on working memory are too high, learners may give up in frustration or fail to comprehend.

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Tags: adult learning principles, job performance, instructional design

How to Overcome Feeling Like a Fraud—The Impostor Syndrome

Posted by Marsha Weisleder on 3/19/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Bruce Mars Via Pexels

I’ll admit I’ve been guilty of this one but, interestingly enough, I’m not alone. It seems many people feel fraudulent in their professions. Two psychologists, Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes, came up with the term “Impostor Syndrome” back in 1978. It’s a feeling of “phoniness in people who believe they are not intelligent, capable or creative despite evidence of high achievement.” Instead of feeling worthy, they feel undeserving, as if a mistake has been made. Despite being experts in their field, they feel it’s only a matter of time before they are found out for who they really are—impostors with limited skills and abilities.

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Tags: instructional techniques

5 Techniques to Incorporate Creativity into Your Training

Posted by Jeff Welch on 3/12/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Bruno Glätsch via Pixabay

Sit in chair. View PowerPoint presentation. Take test. Go back to work.

 

Fellow trainers, if this describes the typical experience of the learners in one of your training sessions, it’s time to make a change. It’s time to get creative!

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How to Ensure the Training Department is Seen as a Partner or Resource

Posted by Beth Brashear on 3/5/18 8:00 AM

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Source: Pixabay

In an organization, the training department is often viewed as the “fun” department rather than a partner or resource for development. How is this image or reputation created? Often, it’s because people aren’t familiar with everything the department has to offer, or all the steps, processes, analysis, development, solutions, etc. that go into training. In addition, training is sometimes viewed as a “one size fits all” solution, meaning it can solve all problems. In fact, training is not always the solution to a performance gap (if the gap even exists). If training is provided when the problem lies elsewhere, the department won’t be seen as a credible resource.

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3 Barriers to Learning and How to Prevent Them

Posted by Lynne Koltookian on 2/26/18 8:00 AM

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Source: pxhere

It always amazes me to see how many things can block the learning process. People are so distracted nowadays. Smart phones present obvious distractions to learning but there are so many other subtle, and not so subtle, ways that can take someone’s focus away from the classroom. Distractions are like thorns in an instructor’s side! We work so hard to make people feel comfortable and to create a pleasant learning environment. What do learners do? Well, sometimes they don’t pay attention or, even worse, they believe they can multi-task and learn at the same time!

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10 Tips for Writing Training Materials

Posted by Steve Flanagan on 2/19/18 8:00 AM

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Photo by: Camille Orgel on Unsplash

The world of writing typically has three areas: literary, academic, and technical. Our first exposure to writing is usually literary. As a child in school, the teacher asked us to write a story or poem about what we did over the summer. We were asked to be descriptive, use imaginative language, and make our story come to life. In high school and into college or university, we were required to produce academic works such as essays, articles, critical papers, and biographies. When writing academic papers, we were often told to meet a word requirement. As a result, we became conditioned to take 5000 words to say something that might only take 500 words.

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4 Ways to Enhance Active Listening

Posted by Linda Carole Pierce on 2/12/18 8:00 AM

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Source: Pixabay

While watching a popular talk show recently, I noticed the people on the panel were constantly talking over one another. They were all trying to get their point across, and their obvious need was to be heard and to be right. It was clear that no one was listening which, of course, makes the show brand so popular. The brand of constant chatter appears to be a trend throughout many areas in our society, making listening a lost art.

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Our very own world-class course leaders share their experiences, tips, best practices, and expertise on virtual training, instructional design, needs analysis, e-learning, delivery, evaluation, presentation skills, facilitation, and much more!

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